Healthy Times

LFCHD Employee Newsletter

LFCHD gives 185 free flu shots

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department provided 185 free flu shots Tuesday evening at its special one-night-only clinic for the community. Flu shots continue to be provided, for a fee, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Thursday in the Public Health Clinic.

The event received news coverage from WKYT, WLEX and WTVQ.

Spread love, not disease!

For Valentine’s Day (and National Condom Day), we promoted Facebook ads with information about free condoms and testing. See our ads below:

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We also placed a table in the front lobby with a bowl of condoms, flyers with testing information, and HIV/STI pamphlets. See our DIOS staff at the table below:

Feb 8 condom display 2

 

 

WIC team participates in the Urban Mountain Challenge

The WIC team participated in the Urban Mountain Challenge at the “Big Blue Building” in downtown Lexington on Saturday, Jan. 27. Jill Keys, Rebekah Shoopman, Jenna Schwartz, Mary Beth Gilles, and Heather Watson attended. The team climbed 30 double flights of stairs and everyone made it to the top!

Health department provides 144 free Narcan kits in community class

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department provided 144 naloxone kits Tuesday at its first class to train the community on the overdose-reversing medication. Due to overwhelming demand, the health department plans to hold additional community classes to be announced soon.

Naloxone, also known by the brand name Narcan, blocks opiate receptors in the brain, works in 1-3 minutes and lasts 30-90 minutes. It can cause withdrawal symptoms such as nausea and disorientation, but there is no risk for abuse or addiction. If given in a timely manner, the antidote can prevent deaths from overdoses due to opioid drugs, such as oxycodone or heroin.

“Ready access to naloxone at home or in the community can save lives,” said Commissioner of Health Dr. Kraig Humbaugh. “Knowing when and how to use Narcan gives people a chance for recovery in the future.”

The free naloxone kits were available to the community through a partnership between the health department, Drug Free Lex and the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Public Health, and a bona fide agent for the Kentucky Department for Public Health.

Staff who worked the event included: Deanna Bond, Maggie Bravo, Sandy Breeding, Lindsay Earlywine, Laura Foley, Kevin Hall, Kim Harris, Cristina Hiten, Dr. Kraig Humbaugh, Jill Keys, Yolanda Loveless, Christy Nentwick, Ruben Perez, Bailey Preston and Dan Satterfield.

Here are some comments from the public:

Welcome new employees!

Please take a moment to welcome the newest employees of the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department.

Milly Muffly

Milly M. Muffly
Nurse Specialist

Carolyn Brophy Huffman

Carolyn L. Brophy-Huffman
Nurse Specialist

Katherine Gardner

Katherine S. Gardner
Nurse Specialist

Health department marks Radon Action Month with free at-home kits

radonJanuary is National Radon Action Month, and we have FREE home test kits! Radon is an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that is found naturally in rocks and soil. It enters homes through cracks and other openings in foundations. Any home can have elevated levels of radon. The only way to know if your home has an elevated radon level is to test. Get your FREE radon testing kit 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday at 650 Newtown Pike. For information, call (859) 231-9791.

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has long promoted radon testing. When homeowners find high levels of radon, they are urged to fix the problem. Typically, radon mitigation systems are installed to reduce the radioactive gas. The systems are designed for continuous suction and exhaust of the gas so it doesn’t collect in basements, crawl spaces and other places within a home.

It is estimated that a million homes in Kentucky have elevated radon levels. Many homeowners are not fully educated on the link between radon and lung cancer, thereby resulting in a small number of residential mitigations. About 1,800-2,000 mitigations are done each year in Kentucky. Also, more newly built homes could be constructed radon-resistant, if the owner requests the builder to put in radon prevention technologies (radon-resistant new construction or RRNC) in the design.

Bailey and Beatty celebrate retirement

We celebrated Elaine Bailey and Yvonne Beatty’s retirement this week. Bailey has 24 years of service and Beatty has 27 years of service. They have both been vital in our mission of helping Lexington be well! We wish them both a happy retirement!

Elaine Yvonne retirement

Elaine Bailey’s retirement party:

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Yvonne Beatty’s retirement party:

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Holiday and travel safety

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Stay safe this holiday season! The main tips for holiday and travel safety include:

  • Stay off the road during and after a winter storm.
  • Keep candles away from flammable materials or consider using flameless candles instead.
  • Keep an eye on food when cooking.
  • Turn off holiday lights at night.
  • Keep your tree watered, do not let your holiday tree dry out.
  • Shop securely online over the holidays.

Board of Health member named healthcare leader

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Dr. Mamata Majmundar, a member of our Board of Health, was recently named a Medical  News Healthcare Leader for 2017. You can read the profile on her here: Dr. Majmundar.

 

Bailey receives recertification as lactation consultant

Doraine

Doraine Bailey, our International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), has recertified her credential. All IBCLC are required to have 75 hours of continuing education every 5 years to recertify. Some of the continuing education topics included breastfeeding practices among Jewish and Muslim mothers; human milk banking; breastfeeding practices among LGBTQ families; infant gut microbiome; diagnoses for breastfeeding-related pain; implications of insulin dysregulation and diabetes for breastfeeding mothers; infant sleep, gut emptying and breastfeeding frequency; hypoplastic breast syndrome; opioids and drug-dependent women; and managing tethered oral tissues.

Doraine now begins her 16th year as an IBCLC with the health department, part of her 27 years with the agency.

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