Healthy Times

LFCHD Employee Newsletter

Archive for the category “Celebrations”

14 donate blood Monday!

 

We had 14 total blood donors Monday, more than doubling the total from the Kentucky Bloodcenter’s last visit in September! Thanks to all who participated, and remember to submit your information for Employee Wellness and Go365 points.

Kim Harris won the drawing for the gift card.

Happy National Nurses Week 2018!

Take a moment to join us and help celebrate National Nurses Week 2018. This year’s theme is “Nurses: Inspire, Innovate, Influence.”

ANA_NNW2018_Logo_Color_previewAnnually, National Nurses Week begins on May 6, marked as Registered Nurse (RN) Recognition Day, and ends on May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of nursing as a modern profession. The American Nurses Association encourages all RNs to participate in recognition activities and to educate the public about the nursing profession and its role in their lives.

Please join us in recognizing the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department’s public health nurses and all they do in helping Lexington be well!

Bailey, Moses win Kentucky Public Health Association awards

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Doraine Bailey and John Moses received Kentucky Public Health Association awards April 26. We salute them for their work in helping Lexington be well!

 

Doraine Bailey

Congratulations to our Doraine Bailey, the 2018 winner of the Kentucky Public Health Association’s Helen B. Fraser Maternal and Child Health Award, given annually to honor someone who has made an exceptional contribution to the health and well-being of mothers and children in Kentucky. Doraine, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, received the award for her work educating Lexington parents about the health benefits of breastfeeding.

The following is the nomination recognizing Doraine:

Doraine Bailey will talk to anyone, anytime, anywhere about the benefits of breastfeeding. In some situations, this could potentially be awkward, but Doraine has an innate ability to disarm discomfort, making the conversation as relaxed and natural as the topic itself.

In my time at the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, she has conducted numerous interviews, often with little notice. It doesn’t matter – she can fill an hour-long interview or a 30-second soundbite with ease, providing the information in easy-to-understand language.

Doraine BaileyRecently, Doraine has given special consideration to groups who have traditionally been outside the standard breastfeeding conversation. She wants to make sure every parent, no matter religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation or income background, feels part of the benefits offered by breastfeeding. By learning more about their backgrounds, including potential obstacles, she is able to speak more directly to the potential clients, allowing their voices to be heard, reminding them that they are important to us.

Over the past few months, Doraine has started talking about the possibility of retiring. It’s something she has most certainly earned, but selfishly, I want her to stay as long as possible – her knowledge, her passion is unparalleled. Because of that, it is with great

pleasure I nominate Doraine for the Helen B. Fraser Maternal and Child Health Award.

John Moses

Congratulations to our John Moses, the 2018 winner of the Kentucky Public Health Association’s Paul Mason Memorial Award, given annually to honor a Kentuckian who has made a significant contribution to benefit our most vulnerable population – the indigent and uninsured. John, who is a linkage navigator ensuring HIV patients get into medical care, received the award for his contributions to Lexington’s needle exchange program!

The following is the nomination recognizing John:

“We have to get past the thinking that they’re ‘junkies behind a dumpster.’”

John MosesThat comment, made in March 2015, paved the way for the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department’s approach to our needle-exchange program. To make it a success, everyone involved had to get past the notion that the clients would somehow be “lesser” humans, the clichés we’ve seen time and again in movies, TV and various pop culture. Instead, they are “somebody’s mother, father, brother, sister, lover, friend – they mean something to someone. They should mean something to us, too.”

Since opening in September 2015, our program has served more than 2,200 individuals, all of whom have their own stories, unique to them despite their shared addiction. Some are homeless; some are professionals; some are young, fresh-faced, almost as if they arrived straight from the University of Kentucky’s campus; some are older, weathered, withered, their bodies likely belying their actual age. All, however, are human, a fact we are reminded of time and again, even (perhaps particularly) whenever we get too bogged down in the numbers of our program. Sure, the epidemiology side of the program is amazing — all the used needles taken in, the hepatitis C and HIV tests given – but there are some things you can’t measure: chances, second, third, beyond; lives changed; lives saved. How do you measure the look on a mother’s face when they thank us for what we’ve done, what we’ve provided?

The men and women who walk through our needle-exchange program are some of Lexington’s most-vulnerable population, a drug-injecting community, often with no insurance, no home, no hope. No matter where they come from, no matter where they’ve been, though, we are there, letting them know that between these doors and under this roof, they matter. They are more than “junkies behind a dumpster.”

That’s why I’m honored to nominate for the Paul Mason Memorial Award, given annually to honor a Kentuckian who has made a significant contribution to benefit our most vulnerable population – the indigent and uninsured – the man who first said the above quote to remind of us the humanity we serve: John Moses, of the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department.

Gilles receives lactation consultant certification

Mary Beth Gilles, a nutrition specialist in WIC, recently received her Certified Lactation Consultant certification.

“With this certification, I want to help raise the statistics of breastfeeding women and infants everywhere,” Gilles said. “There are so many benefits of breastfeeding for both mom and baby, including decreased risk of ovarian cancer, breast cancer and heart disease for women and overall better health for the baby. I am very excited to share the knowledge I have acquired with our clients at WIC and with my WIC team.”March 7 Mary Beth Gilles receives certification

Gilles is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky University with a bachelor’s of health science degree in dietetics. She joined the health department two months after graduation and has been with the WIC program for almost two years.

Gilles says she knew nothing about breastfeeding when she started her job, but it “struck my interest immediately, and I began trying to absorb as much information as I could to help women become comfortable and confident in breastfeeding.”

The ability to share that information is one of Gilles’ favorite parts of working at the health department.

“There are so many aspects I love about my job,” she said, “but there are a couple of things that really exceeded my expectations. The WIC program has taught me so much about nutrition for pregnant/postpartum women, infants and children, and I continue to learn something new every day. I am beyond excited and forever grateful to start my journey as a CLC.”

Board of Health member named healthcare leader

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Dr. Mamata Majmundar, a member of our Board of Health, was recently named a Medical  News Healthcare Leader for 2017. You can read the profile on her here: Dr. Majmundar.

 

Bailey receives recertification as lactation consultant

Doraine

Doraine Bailey, our International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), has recertified her credential. All IBCLC are required to have 75 hours of continuing education every 5 years to recertify. Some of the continuing education topics included breastfeeding practices among Jewish and Muslim mothers; human milk banking; breastfeeding practices among LGBTQ families; infant gut microbiome; diagnoses for breastfeeding-related pain; implications of insulin dysregulation and diabetes for breastfeeding mothers; infant sleep, gut emptying and breastfeeding frequency; hypoplastic breast syndrome; opioids and drug-dependent women; and managing tethered oral tissues.

Doraine now begins her 16th year as an IBCLC with the health department, part of her 27 years with the agency.

Hollinger celebrates retirement

RetirementWe celebrated Elayne Hollinger’s last day Thursday,  Nov. 30, after 20 years and 2 months as part of the public health team in Lexington. Elayne launched the Reducing the Risk sex education and the Postponing Sexual Involvement abstinence education programs in Fayette County’s schools, helping thousands of students throughout the city. We’ll miss her vibrant personality and wish her a happy retirement!

HANDS & WIC host 1st Trunk or Treat

About 150 parents, caregivers and kids took part Thursday in our Trunk or Treat event hosted by the HANDS and WIC programs. Designed for young children, the event gave our staff the opportunity to pass out healthy treats while showcasing the benefits of HANDS and WIC!

Free Flu Shots: The Clinic in Pictures

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department provided 1,026 free flu shots Oct. 5 at Consolidated Baptist Church as part of an annual emergency preparedness exercise. Thanks to everyone who helped make this event another success as we help Lexington be well! Enjoy these pictures from the day: Read more…

LFCHD holds media event to announce free Narcan

In preparation for Friday’s official launch of free Narcan in the needle-exchange program, the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department held a media event to announce the news to the community.

The kits are available through a partnership between the health department and the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Public Health. The kits will be distributed 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fridays in the Dr. Rice C. Leach Community Room.

Dr. HumbaughLFCHD’s Kevin Hall and Dr. Kraig Humbaugh spoke at the event, as did Dr. Svetla Slavova, principal investigator for the grant and associate professor in the UK College of Public Health Department of Biostatistics. She is also a faculty member with the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center, bona fide agent for the Kentucky Department for Public Health. The purchase of Narcan® was supported by a grant 2014-PM-BX-0010 (Data-Driven Multidisciplinary Approaches to Reducing Prescription Abuse in Kentucky) awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice.

Media coverage for the event included the following (Lexington Community Radio also had three show hosts cover the event, including an interview in Spanish, but posts are not yet available):

The entire event can also be found on the LFCHD Facebook page: Narcan announcment (Facebook).

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